Canada: Top Quality Education in a Diverse Environment

Source: Study International | Image: GIPHY

Recent years have seen Canada rise in popularity as a study abroad destination for overseas students. In fact, reports indicate that the number of international students in Canada elevated by a staggering 154% between the years 2010–2018. This is largely because the federal government sees foreign students as beneficial to the country. These students are capable of helping fill skills shortages while also adding cultural diversity to the nation.

International students are attracted to Canada for a wide range of reasons. It is seen as tolerant and offers several programs that help students find success in the country after they graduate. The education system also happens to be world-class and more affordable than other popular study overseas destinations. Several Canadian colleges and universities are can be found ranked among the best in the world.

Community colleges are also a worthwhile, yet lesser known, option for international students looking to pursue higher education in Canada. They offer reduced class sizes and often boast a greater sense of community than larger institutions. Canadian community colleges also serve as a stepping stone for any students who may wish transfer to a university or graduate school later in their academic career.

Canada Eases Application Requirements for Post-Study Work Permits

Source: ICEF | Image Credit: GIPHY

Foreign students in Canada hoping to acquire international work experience after their studies received good news recently. Potential applicants now have twice the amount of time to apply for he country’s Post-Graduation Work Permit. The permit makes it possible for international students who have successfully completed a program of at least eight months to remain in Canada for another three years.

While students previously had 90 days to register for the permit, they now have up to six months from the time they get their final course marks. They also don’t need a currently valid study permit to apply. As long as their study permit was valid within the six month period, overseas students can even return to their home country before applying.

Foreign Students Transforming Canada’s Schools, Immigration

Source: The Globe & Mail | Image Credit: The Tonight Show

While the United States, Great Britain and Australia appear to be becoming less welcoming to international students, Canada continues to improve its reputation as a study abroad destination. Foreign students cite better paying job opportunities in Canada than in their home countries and the inclusive, multicultural society as reasons to study in Canada.

More than 500,000 international students will be studying in Canada this year. Tuition rates more affordable than competing countries and rules that allow foreign students to work while studying continue to attract overseas students to the country. With the number of international students around the world expected to surpass 10 million in the next decade, the Canadian government plans on changing their polices to bring in even more students from around the world.

What To Know About Your Canadian Student Visa

Source: GIPHY, Study International

Studying abroad is a life changing adventure that has the potential to better you in both the short and long term. Unfortunately though, it requires much paperwork before any fun starts. Study International has outlined each of the steps you will need to take before coming to study in Canada.

The first step is deciding which Canadian colleges and universities to apply to. Canada Campus Visits can help with that. By joining us on one of our campus tours, you’ll be able to experience life at up to 10 institutions first-hand and make an informed decision when you’re ready to submit your application.

After applying to your choice of Canadian schools, you are likely to require the following in order to be granted a student visa:

  • Your passport
  • A letter of acceptance from a Canadian institution
  • Evidence that you have the financial ability to live and study in Canada
  • Proof that you will be willing to leave Canada upon completion of your studies
  • Up-to-date medical and criminal records
  • Evidence that you are prepared and willing to study in Canada

With your Canadian student visa, you will be eligible to work during the semester as a student on campus. In time you will also be able to apply for an off-campus work visa, post-graduation work visa and even permanent residence in Canada. Visa applications can require lots of time to be processed though so be sure to apply as soon as possible.

Over Half of Canada’s International Students Want To Stay After Graduation

Source: Study International

The results of a recent survey suggest that more than 60% of students who come to Canada to complete their post-secondary education hope to become permanent residents of ‘The Great White North’ after they graduate.

While pathways to citizenship currently exist for international students, both the government and various institutions feel more can be done. In the coming years, an increased number of employment opportunities, international programs and scholarships will be made available to help make these students feel more at home while they study abroad in Canada.

For further details on the study, visit Study International.

Home Is Where The Heart Is

The best way to understand what makes Canada so appealing to students from around the world is to experience it for yourself. With Canada Campus Visits not only will you see what different colleges and universities are like but you get to immerse yourself in the cities that make Canada great. Book your spot on tour with us and experience ‘The Great White North’ firsthand.

Looking at studying overseas? Why Canada?

Original post by educanada.ca

So you want to study in Canada, but you need just a few more facts before committing to the full experience? Here are a few of the many reasons why others have chosen Canada for their study abroad experience.

Qualifications valued around the world

Canada’s high academic standards and rigorous quality controls mean that you’ll be earning a high-quality education that will open doors for your future and benefit your career over the long term. A Canadian degree, diploma or certificate is globally recognized as being equivalent to those obtained from the United States or Commonwealth countries.

Affordable education

The quality of education and living standards in Canada are amongst the highest in the world, but the cost of living and tuition fees for international students are generally lower than in other countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom. As such, Canada is often the preferred choice for students attending college or university.

Multicultural society

With almost all of the world’s ethnic groups represented in Canada, it’s hard not to find ethnic foods and recreation activities associated with specific cultures. In fact, your international student advisor can help you get in touch with any number of ethnic clubs and associations for you to join while you’re here.

Healthy and safe communities

While you may have heard of or experienced Canadians’ friendly and open nature, you may not have known that the United Nations consistently ranks Canada as one of the best places in the world to live. As an international student in Canada, you’ll enjoy all of the same freedoms which protect Canadians – respect for human rights, equality, and a stable and peaceful society.

World-class language education

Did you know that Canada is a bilingual country and is considered a world leader in language training? Since teaching French and English as a first and second language is an integral part of a Canadian education, you will be able to improve your fluency and capacity for either language as you further your studies.

Exciting campus lifestyle

Canada’s post-secondary campuses aren’t only wired with the latest in sophisticated technology, but countless other modern amenities as well. From Olympic-quality sports facilities to public concert halls and art galleries, Canada’s post-secondary campuses offer you enormous possibilities for learning and leisure. Plus, you’ll have incredible opportunities to meet like-minded individuals and gain valuable experience through student-run governments, radio, newspapers, and businesses.

Innovative and abundant research opportunities

Since research is one of the key components of a Canadian post-secondary education, you’ll have ample opportunity to become a part of this vibrant aspect of education. In Canada, government and industry together support research including telecommunications, medicine, agriculture, computer technology, and environmental science.

Land of possibilities

Under Canada’s highly dynamic and hands-on academic environment, you will not only acquire knowledge and skills in analysis and communication, but you will also learn how to express yourself, demonstrate your creativity, and develop your self-confidence! Teachers and professors are always available and eager to help with lessons, and studies fuse academic excellence with interaction and collaboration in the classroom.

Possibility of immigration

Did you know that some international students with Canadian credentials and Canadian work experience may apply for permanent residency without having to leave Canada? For more information about the possibility of immigration to Canada once your schooling is complete, please visit the Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada website.

Making Friends Abroad: What you need to know before you go

Originally from Canadian Bureau for International Education Student Blog

The contents of this post detail one very introverted and very awkward individual’s experience making friends abroad during her year abroad.

Going abroad is kind of like going through your freshman year of college all over again; everyone is new, everyone is nervous and awkward, and everyone is desperate to find their group of friends – and fast. Sparked by a fear of being left out, you could find yourself halfway through your semester abroad, looking at the (very nice) individuals you hang out with every weekend, and thinking to yourself,

“I don’t have anything in common with these people.”

Maybe this post will help you avoid that. Or maybe you’ll end up in that situation anyway.

It’s easy to be lonely
Going abroad can be a daunting experience because loneliness is a more apparent option than ever. It’s at times like this when you think to yourself how much easier life would be if you were an extrovert – always the first to click “going” to a expat meetup event on Facebook, always the first to introduce yourself first to the person sitting next to you in class, always the first to follow someone you met “that one time at that one place” on Instagram. If you are like that, then making friends abroad should be as easy on your year abroad as it is anywhere else. But if you aren’t, things get a little more complicated.

Trial and error
You’re going to have to go through a lot more “trial and error” in finding the people who you feel compatible with: pushing yourself to go to events that you don’t want to go to, and introducing yourself to people who you have little interest in. In short, you’re going to have to make an effort that you normally wouldn’t have to make back home. It can be tiring, annoying, and a pain. At one point, you’ll probably find yourself fully dressed and ready to head out the door, but thinking to yourself that watching Friends in your sweats would make for such a better night.

Perseverance is key
But, if you want my honest opinion, the awkward moments when you’re really not clicking with the person you’re talking to, the times when the event you were looking forward to ended up being a bust, the situations when the person sitting next to you seems to have little interest in whatever you’re trying to say… they’re worth it.

People need other people, and your time abroad isn’t an exception to that rule. When you’re studying in a different country (likely in a culture that you didn’t grow up in, constantly surrounded by a language you might not be able to speak), being able to share the stupid embarrassing stories – where you accidentally offended the waiter or tripped face-first walking down the street – is everything.

For some people it’s easy to meet new people. For others, not so much. No matter who you are, it’s necessary and important.

Yeji Lee, University of Toronto, Sciences Po

Making Friends Abroad: What you need to know before you go

Originally from Canadian Bureau for International Education Student Blog

The contents of this post detail one very introverted and very awkward individual’s experience making friends abroad during her year abroad.

Going abroad is kind of like going through your freshman year of college all over again; everyone is new, everyone is nervous and awkward, and everyone is desperate to find their group of friends – and fast. Sparked by a fear of being left out, you could find yourself halfway through your semester abroad, looking at the (very nice) individuals you hang out with every weekend, and thinking to yourself,

“I don’t have anything in common with these people.”

Maybe this post will help you avoid that. Or maybe you’ll end up in that situation anyway.

It’s easy to be lonely
Going abroad can be a daunting experience because loneliness is a more apparent option than ever. It’s at times like this when you think to yourself how much easier life would be if you were an extrovert – always the first to click “going” to a expat meetup event on Facebook, always the first to introduce yourself first to the person sitting next to you in class, always the first to follow someone you met “that one time at that one place” on Instagram. If you are like that, then making friends abroad should be as easy on your year abroad as it is anywhere else. But if you aren’t, things get a little more complicated.

Trial and error
You’re going to have to go through a lot more “trial and error” in finding the people who you feel compatible with: pushing yourself to go to events that you don’t want to go to, and introducing yourself to people who you have little interest in. In short, you’re going to have to make an effort that you normally wouldn’t have to make back home. It can be tiring, annoying, and a pain. At one point, you’ll probably find yourself fully dressed and ready to head out the door, but thinking to yourself that watching Friends in your sweats would make for such a better night.

Perseverance is key
But, if you want my honest opinion, the awkward moments when you’re really not clicking with the person you’re talking to, the times when the event you were looking forward to ended up being a bust, the situations when the person sitting next to you seems to have little interest in whatever you’re trying to say… they’re worth it.

People need other people, and your time abroad isn’t an exception to that rule. When you’re studying in a different country (likely in a culture that you didn’t grow up in, constantly surrounded by a language you might not be able to speak), being able to share the stupid embarrassing stories – where you accidentally offended the waiter or tripped face-first walking down the street – is everything.

For some people it’s easy to meet new people. For others, not so much. No matter who you are, it’s necessary and important.

Yeji Lee, University of Toronto, Sciences Po