Mandatory Vaccines a Possibility for Canadian Higher Education

Source: The PIE, Academica Group

While COVID-19 vaccines have not yet been deemed required by every designated learning institution in Canada, recent decisions may indicate that such a measure may be incoming.

Fanshawe College, Trent University, Western University, and Ryerson University have all declared that students living in residence must have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine before they are allowed entry. Meanwhile the University of Toronto will require students to be vaccinated within two weeks of moving in.

International students who have been unable to receive a vaccination in their home country will have access to vaccines approved by Health Canada and can receive one anywhere in the country at no cost.

With an increased infection rate among younger people, vaccines will help students have a more typical student residence experience. They deserve to feel safe as they interact and grow as a part of the campus community. We will continue to monitor what steps other higher learning institutions take in the weeks to come.

Canadian Universities Return to In-Person Learning in September

Source: Study International

As COVID-19 vaccines are being administered to Canadians across the country, a sense of normalcy is beginning to return. Universities, colleges, and other designated learning institutions now have the confidence to plan for Fall and Winter semesters that involve students on campus.

Institutions in different provinces must follow their own public safety guidelines before welcoming students back to classes at pre-pandemic levels. As a result of this, the re-opening of campuses is happening faster in some parts of Canada and more gradually in others.

While McGill University and the University of British Columbia expect the upcoming Fall semester to feature in-person classes, hybrid classroom models are being proposed elsewhere. Both the University of Windsor and the University of Ottawa will use online and regular classes when they welcome students again.

We encourage you to read the original article to see what more institutions intend to do later this year. If there are specific universities or colleges you are interested in, be sure to visit their websites for the most accurate information.

Sheridan’s Open Innovation Challenge Rethinks Education

Participants across Canada are invited to engage in an open innovation challenge focused on reimagining learning and education in a time of unrelenting disruption.

As a trailblazing postsecondary institution and well-connected community and industry partner, Sheridan College is facilitating the Reimagine Learning and Education in our Communities Challenge to reach and amplify underrepresented voices, spark inclusive dialogue, embrace – not hide from – the forces of disruption prevalent in industry and society, and cultivate meaningful solutions.

The challenge is inspired by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, which emphasize the interrelated impacts of changes within society, the economy and the environment, and the transformative power of education. Individuals and teams will be called on to contribute ideas via a range of mediums, grounded in the question: How might we collaborate with our communities to reimagine learning and education so that no one is left behind and all youth and adults can realize their full potential?

By building the challenge using a human-centred design approach that puts people at the centre of the process, “we’re ensuring that participants’ ideas and subsequent solutions aren’t prescriptive, but instead, are reflective of the very people we hope they impact,” says challenge co-organizer John Helliker, Dean of Innovation at Sheridan.

The Inspiration Stage of the challenge will run from November 18, 2020 to January 2021 and will focus on hearing ideas, stories and experiences from as many people as possible, regardless of their level of education, identity, location and circumstances. The second and third stages – Ideation and Iteration respectively – will require teams of participants to begin working on solutions to issues that emerged in the first stage. Mentors from community organizations and academia will provide guidance to teams throughout.

The challenge is being generously supported by sponsors TD Insurance, The Personal Insurance Company, Merit Security and Cyber Air Systems Inc. It is being hosted on the internationally recognized platform Agorize. A final event in May 2021 will feature presentations from pre-selected finalists. Exceptionally innovative and impactful solutions will be recognized by a panel of esteemed judges and the audience. Throughout the challenge, more than $60,000 in cash prizes are available to be won.

Learn more about the Open Innovation Challenge and get involved at: challenge.sheridancollege.ca

About Sheridan College

Founded in 1967, Sheridan has grown from a local college of 400 students to one of Ontario’s leading post-secondary institutions, educating approximately 23,000 full-time and 20,000 continuing and part-time studies students every year, on three campuses in Brampton, Mississauga and Oakville. An award-winning institution, Sheridan attracts students from across Canada and around the world.  Sheridan’s 190,000 alumni play a critical role in shaping the future of our society in the fields of arts, business, community service, health, technology, and the skilled trades.  In January 2020, Sheridan was listed among the top 100 in the Forbes Magazine’s list of Canada’s Best Employers.

For further information contact: Keiko Kataoka, Manager, Communications and Public Relations [email protected], 905-815-4080

Chinese Students Say They Still Plan to Study in Canada

Source: University Affairs | Image Credit: Kochstrasse

Some overseas students have found themselves worried about moving to North America for their studies due to ongoing racial tensions. While a recent article in University Affairs highlights students from Asian countries, this group certainly is not the first to experience such apprehension. While any instance of racism on a Canadian college or university campus will be dealt with by the proper authorities, the fact remains that even one racist incident is too many.

International students coming to Canada should know that faculty and their fellow students will support them if they need to talk or feel worried about stories they see online. Campuses in Canada are largely very multicultural with students who come from all walks of life. Many have felt the same way and are more than happy to help newcomers through what they might be going through. When it comes to equality, we are all in this together.

Canada Beats US in Sustainable Campus Index

Source: University to Business | Image Credit: goforzero

Canada has found much success in major competitions as of late. Canadians have topped the 2019 US Open in tennis as well as the 2018-19 NBA basketball season. Now Canada has squeaked out another victory against American competition.

According to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, Canadian university campuses were recently ranked above their counterparts in the United States when it comes to global sustainability. For the full report, please visit University to Business.

How To Revamp Your Time Management

Source: University Affairs | Image Credit: Desus and Mero

With so many things to do before your study abroad adventure begins, it is important to make sure your time management skills are sharp. With applying for study visas, admission to colleges and universities, and scholarships, feeling as though there are not enough hours in the day is understandable. Here is a list of tips to improve your ability to get everything done on time.

  • Ask for help: Being resourceful will help you accomplish tasks more efficiently.
  • Organize your workspace: Organization will strengthen your focus and limit distractions.
  • Determine what makes you productive: Understand when and where you are most motivated to get work done.
  • Entourage matters: Build a support network to encourage you to keep going.
  • Working through feedback: Don’t let criticism hold you back. Learn what you can from it and continue on your path.
  • Talking back to your perfectionism: If you were already perfect, you wouldn’t need to be in school learning. Relax and take time to grow.

What Parents Can Do To Help Their Kids Transition to College

Source: Study International | Image Credit: Robert E Blackmon

According to recent research, stress is on the rise among college and university aged individuals. Moving from high school to a post-secondary institution, especially one that is abroad, can be a lot for anyone to handle. As a parent, one might want to help the students in their family but not know what steps to take. Luckily, there’s a list for that:

  • Encourage students to seek help if they need it. Counselors and support groups and are willing to help if students are willing to share what they’re going through.
  • Put yourself in their shoes. Even if you haven’t pursued your own post-secondary education, share stories about challenges you’ve faced.
  • Set expectations. Make sure they know what you hope they can achieve and listen to them if they think your goals are unrealistic.
  • Let them know the standards are higher now. It can be hard adjusting to studying on your own and having deadlines that aren’t flexible. Save them the trouble of having to learn this the hard way.
  • Forgive mistakes. No one is perfect and there are always bumps in the road for students. Teach them that it’s okay to mess up as long as they learn their lesson and work to get better over time.

Stop Stressing About Your Grades

Source: Study International | Image Credit: The Muppets

Choosing to study in a foreign country is a major decision for anyone to make. It is understandable that many international students spend a large portion of their time worrying about their grades when they’ve already committed so much to pursuing their education abroad. If you’re one of these overseas students, here are some things you can do other than stress yourself out during your time abroad:

  • Set goals for yourself
  • Get enough sleep
  • Get regular exercise
  • Spend time on your hobbies/interests
  • Be with your friends

While each of these seem simple, they are crucial to remember. Taking care of yourself properly will help keep the stress away so you have less worries and more time to breathe.

A Day in the Life of a Student in Canada

Source: Times Higher Education | Image Credit: Vanderbilt University

If you’re curious about what a typical day is like for an international student who chose to study in Canada, you’re in luck. Times Higher Education published an article from a student outlining what a regular day on campus is like for her. She discusses commuting to school, what her courses are like at university, places on campus to study and how she spends her free time.

Of course, your experience as a foreign student may differ. Some colleges and universities are bigger than others and cities across Canada offer varying amounts of hustle and bustle. To get an authentic feel for student life in Canada, our campus tours are open and are great at helping overseas students find out what Canadian school is best for them.

Women in STEM: The Benefits of Studying Abroad

Source: Times Higher Education | Image Credit: GIPHY

An international student recently described her experiences in a Times Higher Education article. Upon moving to a new country to pursue a higher education, she had to adjust to life in a multicultural area that was completely new to her.

When she successfully completed her overseas education, the experience she gained while living and working abroad set her apart from the competition when pursuing a job after graduation. The student feels that her communication skills were improved as a direct result of her time immersed in a foreign culture. She recommends an international education to any student looking to improve their career opportunities.